Jun 052014
 

The Service Oriented Toolkit for Research Data Management project was co-funded by the JISC Managing Research Data Programme 2011-2013 and The University of Hertfordshire. The project focused on the realisation of practical benefits for operationalising an institutional approach to good practice in RDM. The objectives of the project were to audit current best practice, develop technology demonstrators with the assistance of leading UH research groups, and then reflect these developments back into the wider internal and external research community via a toolkit of services and guidance. The overall aim was to contribute to the efficacy and quality of research data plans, and establish and cement good data management practice in line with local and national policy.

The final report is available via http://hdl.handle.net/2299/13636

Blog Survey based on Digital Asset Framework http://bit.ly/18QUZR9
Survey Survey results http://bit.ly/1ao74vy
Report Survey analysis http://bit.ly/128uGMK
Blog UH Research Data Policy in a nutshell http://bit.ly/14cXC9w
Artefact Interview protocol, used by project analyst and RDM champions http://bit.ly/12Jr9KZ
Case studies 12 Case Studies http://bit.ly/19MjnD3
Review Review of cloud storage services: features, costs, issues for HE http://bit.ly/12Jn2yz
Blog Files in the cloud http://bit.ly/R583If
Test data Files transfer rate tests http://bit.ly/1266WsJ
Blog Analysis of barriers to use of local networked storage http://bit.ly/12Gleqg
Blog Hybrid-Cloud model: when the cloud works and the attraction of Dropbox et al. http://bit.ly/Xvmidr
Blog Hybrid-Cloud example: Zendto on Rackspace, integrated with local systems http://bit.ly/11In83q
Service UH file exchange https://www.exchangefile.herts.ac.uk/
Blog Cost of ad-hoc storage http://bit.ly/19ilycQ
Blog Cost of data loss event http://bit.ly/13RSckb
Blog Reflection on use of Rackspace CloudFiles
Blog Data Encryption http://bit.ly/XxDoEM
Training Data Encryption workshop http://bit.ly/11rwLXA
Training Data Encryption guide http://bit.ly/QHyN2y
Blog Document Management for Clinical Trials http://bit.ly/15cfT5K
Artefact eTMF – electronic Trial Master File, 1954 legacy documents scanned no public access
Artfifact Research Project File Plan http://bit.ly/11InVkW
Workflow Post award storage allocation
Workflow Request ‘Research Storage’ Form http://bit.ly/17V7J8t
Workflow Research Grant and Storage Process http://bit.ly/14kvCB0
Workflow Request ‘Research Storage’ Workflow http://bit.ly/12d2aJP
Service R: (R drive), workgroup space with external access access by workgroups
Service DMS, workgroup space with external access access by workgroups
Dataset 4 Oral history datasets, ~300 interviews, 125GB http://bit.ly/uh-hhub
Dataset 1 Leisure studies dataset, SPSS survey, interviews, transcripts, 8GB in preparation
Blog Comparison of data licenses http://bit.ly/12DmXfR
Report Comparison of data licenses http://bit.ly/13NC7gA
Service UHRA repository improvements phase 1 http://uhra.herts.ac.uk/
Blog DOIs for datasets, includes mind map http://bit.ly/QonFoN
Workflow Deposit/access criteria for data with a levels of openness http://bit.ly/12cUqrq
Service RDM micro site (aka Research Data Toolkit), 100+ pages and pdfs of RDM guidance http://bit.ly/uh-rdm
Report Register of Programme engagement at external events, estimated audience 480, ~300 individuals Appendix A
Blog Programme engagement: 38 Blog posts http://research-data-toolkit.herts.ac.uk/
Presentation Association of Research Managers and Administrators Conference 2013 http://bit.ly/ZXv8RK
Presentation UH RDM Stakeholder briefing June 2012 http://bit.ly/11KkJGo
Presentation UH HeaIth and Human Sciences research forum July 2012 http://bit.ly/15cDUKb
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Nottingham 2012: storage http://bit.ly/10qpry3
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Nottingham 2012: repository http://bit.ly/126zjab
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Nottingham 2012: training http://bit.ly/15cH1lj
Presentation JANET/JISCMRD Storage Requirements workshop Paddington 2013 http://bit.ly/12QFu9S
Presentation JISCMRD benefits evidence workshop Bristol 2013 http://bit.ly/ZXE09Y
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Aston 2013: training http://bit.ly/11t3Lg0
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Aston 2013: agent of change http://bit.ly/13NVIgH
Presentation JISCMRD progress workshop Aston 2013: storage http://bit.ly/19Juixf
Report Register of programme engagement at UH events: interviews (~60), meetings, seminars , workshops. Total attendance 400, est 200-300 individuals Appendix B
DMP 10 data management plans, facilitated by RDM champions and Research Grants Advisor limited public access
Report 6 project manager’s reports to Steering Group no public access
Report Benefits report http://bit.ly/19V1rWS
Report Final Report http://hdl.handle.net/2299/13636

Conclusions

There are many conclusions that could be drawn from the project. These are the headlines:

  • JISCMRD has been a success at UH.
  • The RDTK project has made an impact in awareness raising and service development, and made good inroads into professional development and training. There are good materials, a legacy of knowledge and a retained group of people to sustain and develop the learning.
  • We believe the service orientated approach shows that better technology can facilitate better RDM and the project has been an effective Agent for Change.
  • We also understand that advocacy and training are as important as technology to bring about cultural change.
  • Funding body policy and the implications of the ever increasing volume of data are understood. The business case is clear: the University cannot afford not to invest in RDM.
  • JISCMRD phase2 has been an effective vehicle for knowledge transfer and collaboration. It provided an environment in which a new and complex discipline, and the many, interacting, conflicting, seemingly endless issues therein, could be explored with common cause and mutual support.

Recommendations

JISCMRD activity should continue, and try to reach the part of the research community that is least able to adopt RDM best practice without assistance, and won’t do so as a matter of course. A profitable strand for JISCMRD3 would be Collaborative Services. Appropriate services would include joint RDM support services, or shared specific services, such as regional repositories (including DOI provision) or shared workgroup storage facilities. Institutions with advanced RDM capability could play a mentoring role. Another key strand would be Benefit of Data Re-use; to gather examples of innovative data use and academic merit and reward for individual data publishers.

The DCC should continue in its institutional support role. It should consolidate its DMPonline tool toward a cloud service, with features to allow organisational branding, and template merging. It should place new emphasis on the selection and publishing of data, with a signposting tool for Tier 1 and Tier 2 repositories for subject specific data, including selection criteria, metadata requirements, and citation rates.

Opportunities for organisations to learn from each other and establish collaborations, which have been effective at JISCMRD2 workshops, should continue to be facilitated in some way. In addition, more attempts should be made to reach researchers directly in order to demonstrate the potential personal benefit of good RDM.

The JISC should continue to pursue national agreements via the JANET brokerage. These negotiations should be widened beyond Infrastructure as a Service to include RDM Applications as a Service (RAaaS), for example, Backup as a Service, Workgroup Storage, and Repository as a Service. The goal should be to achieve terms of use which satisfy institutional purchasing, IP and governance requirements; whilst allowing for acquisition by smaller intra-institutional units, from faculty, down to workgroup level. (JISC GRAIL- Generic Rdm Applications Independently Licenced) might be suitable brand for this activity. In addition, JANET should press cloud vendors for an alternative to ‘pay-by-access’ for data which is a barrier to uptake in fixed cost project work.